biologizeable
asapscience:

utcjonesobservatory:

Not very professional but it does express my personal displeasure for the current state of where are funds are being distributed >_> I might be a little biased

"In just one year, the expenditure of of the U.S.’s military budget is equivalent to the entire 50-year running budget of NASA combined." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

asapscience:

utcjonesobservatory:

Not very professional but it does express my personal displeasure for the current state of where are funds are being distributed >_> I might be a little biased

"In just one year, the expenditure of of the U.S.’s military budget is equivalent to the entire 50-year running budget of NASA combined." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

callisparrow

callisparrow:

coldlikedeath:

ughsocialjustice:

general—jinjur:

callingoutbadfeminism:

dropmycumberbritchesreceipts:

vegetableighs:

African American unarmed teenager shot by police. *silence*

Rich, white, old cis male kills himself. *mourning and social awareness*

African American unarmed teenager shot by police;…

We can care about and be angry over both men, OK? Had Michael Brown been mentally ill and killed himself, who’s to say the same thing wouldn’t be happening? I’m angry over Mike too, and sad about Robin. We can protest the unfairness of both, and show our anger over how they died, albeit by different methods. Neither is worth less than the other for being “a rich, white, cis male” or “an African American teen”. How dare you.

Seriously, we can’t even be sad about a man’s suicide now because he was wealthy and white?  Fuck you, original poster.  The previous responses to your idiocy are far more articulate than I and say everything that needs to be said.  Just… augh.

darklydreamingdraca

sleepysheepie:

cismouse:

killcode102:

cismouse:

GUYS

THEY ARE TRYING TO TAKE THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT DOWN

AND REPLACE IT WITH THE BULLSHIT ENDANGERED SPECIES MANAGEMENT SELF-DETERMINATION ACT

THAT ALLOWS STATES TO DECIDE  IF THEY EVEN WANT TO ABIDE BY LAWS PROTECTING SPECIES AT ALL

AND DELISTS SPECIES AFTER ONLY FIVE YEARS

DOES ANYONE ELSE EVEN CARE

Source this

1 2 3 4 5

better question; how do we stop this?

alphynix
alphynix:

Marine Reptile Month #18 — Plotosaurus
Late Cretaceous period (72-66 mya)
Plotosaurus was one of the most “advanced” mosasaurs in terms of anatomical adaptations, with a highly streamlined body and a large tail fin enabling it to swim at high speeds as a pursuit predator. It grew to lengths of between 9 and 13m (25’6”-42’8”), and probably fed on fish, ammonites, smaller marine reptiles, and aquatic birds — swallowing them almost whole thanks to snake-like flexible jaws.
And, yes, mosasaurs almost certainly had forked tongues. Based on their evolutionary relationships to varanoids and snakes, it’s also possible that they might have been venomous, too.
Color palette used: “Poesie”

alphynix:

Marine Reptile Month #18 — Plotosaurus

Late Cretaceous period (72-66 mya)

Plotosaurus was one of the most “advanced” mosasaurs in terms of anatomical adaptations, with a highly streamlined body and a large tail fin enabling it to swim at high speeds as a pursuit predator. It grew to lengths of between 9 and 13m (25’6”-42’8”), and probably fed on fish, ammonites, smaller marine reptiles, and aquatic birds — swallowing them almost whole thanks to snake-like flexible jaws.

And, yes, mosasaurs almost certainly had forked tongues. Based on their evolutionary relationships to varanoids and snakes, it’s also possible that they might have been venomous, too.

Color palette used: “Poesie

Again, leupaks. I draw them when my brain stops working, it seems. 
I also cannot draw muzzles face-on. Or feet. Oh, well. At least the coloring doesn’t infuriate me.
Once again, made with the leupak generator. This was a humanoid leupak with six limbs, winged ears, a bony spine (not visible), and a sail tail (which I made to be bone).

Again, leupaks. I draw them when my brain stops working, it seems. 

I also cannot draw muzzles face-on. Or feet. Oh, well. At least the coloring doesn’t infuriate me.

Once again, made with the leupak generator. This was a humanoid leupak with six limbs, winged ears, a bony spine (not visible), and a sail tail (which I made to be bone).

Apparently, when I’m under stress, I draw leupaks. Maybe not the best leupaks, but here they are.
(Made with the leupak generator; this was a sauroid leupak with six legs, a split tail, and a tentacle spine.
Edit: It should have ears. I don’t remember ever thinking about ears. Dammit.)

Apparently, when I’m under stress, I draw leupaks. Maybe not the best leupaks, but here they are.

(Made with the leupak generator; this was a sauroid leupak with six legs, a split tail, and a tentacle spine.

Edit: It should have ears. I don’t remember ever thinking about ears. Dammit.)

griseus
griseus:

ORCAS AND OTHER ANIMALS MAY SPEAK WITH COMPLEXITY

Many species of animals produce vocalizations comprising multiple element types, combined into complex sequences. Some species have vocal repertoires of tens or even hundreds of discrete elements; others have only a handful, but use them to generate a wide variety of combinations. Most researchers assume that these sequences are well characterized as Markov chains (i.e. that the probability of a particular vocal element can be calculated from the history of only a finite number of preceding elements).
The vocalizations of orangutans, finches, killer whales and four other animal species have some form of grammar and may be more language-like in structure than previously thought. The results, along with other studies, challenge the breadth of the disparity between human language and and the seemingly simple generation of sounds animals are thought to produce. More research may reveal an evolutionary step that links the two.

Reference: Kershenbaum et al. 2014.Animal vocal sequences: not the Markov chains we thought they were
Photo by Cristina Martín

griseus:

ORCAS AND OTHER ANIMALS MAY SPEAK WITH COMPLEXITY

Many species of animals produce vocalizations comprising multiple element types, combined into complex sequences. Some species have vocal repertoires of tens or even hundreds of discrete elements; others have only a handful, but use them to generate a wide variety of combinations. Most researchers assume that these sequences are well characterized as Markov chains (i.e. that the probability of a particular vocal element can be calculated from the history of only a finite number of preceding elements).

The vocalizations of orangutans, finches, killer whales and four other animal species have some form of grammar and may be more language-like in structure than previously thought. The results, along with other studies, challenge the breadth of the disparity between human language and and the seemingly simple generation of sounds animals are thought to produce. More research may reveal an evolutionary step that links the two.